Saturday, 11 April 2009

At the bottom of the garden

A dark and mysterious backyard dominates the space of Night Garden. Viewed from either end of CarriageWorks’ cavernous Bay 20, the centrepiece of this stunningly realised stage environment is a small shed in which all of the walls are transparent—a glasshouse, seemingly itching for stones. Surrounding the house is a shadowy lawn incongruously populated with sun lounges, a clothesline and a backyard tennis game that spins lazily around when hit. The audience peers into the backyard through a scorched skeletal wall, and stars glisten far in the distance. Despite the suburban trappings, there’s no sense here of the proximity of any other houses. The building and yard form an island, one in which the inhabitants may not be entirely safe.


Read the rest of my article, published in the print and online editions of RealTime #90, here. Image by Heidrun Lohr.

Thursday, 9 April 2009

Blast Theory: Small secrets in public spaces

Navigating my way through crowds of tourists at Circular Quay, I arrive at a special check-in counter inside Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art ready to experience Brighton UK-based new media group Blast Theory’s Rider Spoke. The artist team who welcome me—core Blast Theory artists Matt Adams, Ju Row Farr and Nick Tandavanitj with the able assistance of a group of local guest artists—are polite, friendly, and casually dressed in colourful checked shirts. I autograph various insurance and indemnity forms, display my credit card, and then receive a short briefing and my equipment—helmet, headphones, and a bicycle with a small tablet computer mounted on the handlebars.

Read the rest of my article, published in the print and online editions of RealTime #90, here. Image by Alex Kershaw.